Police Brutality

Police Brutality

Kenya has a long history of policing with excessive force, often resulting in unnecessary deaths. The brutality exhibited by Kenya’s police force traces its roots to British colonial rule, poor recruitment policies, corruption and poor accountability for police actions. Under the British colonial government the role of the police was to protect the interests of the administration. It was not to serve the interests of the general populace.

Successive post-independence leaders used the police units to suppress dissenting voices; as a tool for repression and assassinations as well as detention and torture of political opponents and to advance their own interests. 

The main role of the police service is to prevent, control, detect and investigate crime. But in practice, its members act more like a paramilitary unit trained to deal with conflict and serious disorder. This logic takes on a different nuance in how the police approach and treat its citizens, especially those who are poor, marginalised and dispossessed. 

KLM is committed to a radical policy agenda of police reform that builds on the recommendations from Ransley report on police reform and other documents authored that provide solutions to the curb police brutality, extrajudicial killings and criminal activities perpetrated by the police forces.