Devolution

Devolution

Devolution

For almost the entire period since Kenya’s independence on December 12, 1963, the country’s politics has been organised around divisions: Ethnic, religious, racial, regional, clan and gender, generational, pastoralists versus agriculturalists, and most recently, divisions driven by xenophobia.
But after Kenya promulgated a progressive Constitution on August 27, 2010, The Constitution aims to bring an end to the organisation of politics through division; cement agreement on national values and principles; promote integrity in public and private leadership, and build depersonalised national institutions and provide a framework for the equitable distribution of political power and the resources of society.
Devolution is a key pillar of the new constitution. Indeed, devolution has been good but is not yet great. Because of a hostile national government and endemic corruption in the counties, devolved governments have not performed optimally although, compared to the central government’s record of the last 50 years, they have made a big difference in people’s daily lives. Although devolution has been revolutionary, a combination of frustration from the top (especially from the Treasury the Devolution Ministry (particularly the first one) and the Provincial Administration) and the extremely poor and corrupt leadership of some governors have delayed the devolution dividends.

KLM is committed to strengthening devolution through civic education, lobby for laws and policies that cement equitable distribution of resources and will lend its voice and support to the Council of Governors’ demands for the arrears in development funds that the national government continues to refuse to disburse.